Making a Splash in Business - Raincatcher

05-Aug-2010

Raincatcher who install the Sturdy Hydro-Store Rainwater Harvesting System recently featured in the Sunday Business Post.  See a  copy of the article below.

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When Dave Goulding was made redundant from a large telecoms firm earlier this year, he decided on a complete change of direction in his career.

Goulding had spent 13 years in telecoms retailing and was head of retail for O2 before a restructuring of the company last February. In the months before he lost his job, Goulding had started to research the possibility of launching a business in rainwater harvesting.

He found that the industry was worth €300million in Germany, where it has created more than 5,000 jobs, and is also common in parts of Australia and New Zealand.

When his friend Peter Dignam - who works as a builder - found suppliers who could make the tanks required for the work, they decided to launch Raincatcher. Goulding and Dignam set about drawing up a business plan, which was changed several times with the help of a business mentor from the Dublin Enterprise Board. They eventually secured €18,000 in funding from the board for the new business.

Raincatcher installs tanks in homes and businesses to catch rainwater. It is then filtered and can be used in washing machines, toilets, garden hoses, and even showers, if a UV feature is added.

The systems work by collecting water in downpipes, filtering it and storing it in an underground tank.The water is then pumped into a tank in the building, and used for nondrinking purposes.

For businesses who have to pay hefty water levies - and homes that may face water charges in the future - there are significant savings to be made, according to Goulding.

Standard domestic rainwater harvesting systems cost from €2,500, while large tanks for businesses cost up to €8,000. Dignam carries out the installation, and plumbers and other sub-contractors work for the company when required.

Goulding said that he had no regrets about going into business for himself. ‘‘The business plan was the hardest thing I have ever done and a lot of people were being negative about it,” he said. ‘‘But I did the research, and water charges are on the way for domestic users, so that is when I expect things to really take off.”

His message for other people facing career uncertainty is not to be ground down by negativity.

‘‘Change within their working lives can often open new doors and challenges that they would never have thought of before,” he said. ‘‘Change is not to be feared, but should be embraced. There is hope out there and we should all look at doing something different and innovative.”

Sunday Business Post - Sunday 25th July 2010



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